Animals with Fancy Hats


historical fashion is my fandom, sewing and knitting are my hobbies, and I am basically the definition of a mori girl.

Ask me anything

svanhild-bjorndottir:

Viking women <3

Source: svanhild-bjornsdottir

Source: enolajay

spiritied:

berengia:

Michael Trapp, a garden designer, decorator, and antique dealer, created this lushly romantic bathroom. The tub is a 19th century French tin tub. There’s a real sense of nature in this room! Photograph (C) John Vaughan, from my book ‘Bathrooms

spiritied:

berengia:

Michael Trapp, a garden designer, decorator, and antique dealer, created this lushly romantic bathroom. The tub is a 19th century French tin tub. There’s a real sense of nature in this room! Photograph (C) John Vaughan, from my book ‘Bathrooms

Source: berengia

buttons-beads-lace:

And then there are ones like this that are just too fancy to be allowed. 

The Victoria and Albert Museum says:

Viols were bowed instruments ranging from treble to bass, but by about 1780 they had been superceded by the violin and cello. However, this bass viol belonged to John Cawse (1779-1862), one of the earliest pioneers in the revival of Early Music. The body may have been made by Joachim Tielke (1641-1719), but the neck, fingerboard and tailpiece date from the mid 1720s. Cawse lent his instrument to be played in the Concert of Ancient Music at Windsor Castle, an event organized by Prince Albert (1819-1861) in 1845 and perhaps the first of its kind. Despite what was then a highly unusual enthusiasm, Prince Albert felt compelled to make economies in the Royal Household and abolish the obsolete post of Royal Lutenist at about this time.

Source: buttons-beads-lace

buttons-beads-lace:

Nécessaire, Britain, 1766.  (source)

A ‘nécessaire’ was a luxury object designed to hold a whole range of ‘necessary’ scent bottles and cosmetic and writing implements for use by a woman of fashion. The contents include five bottles with stoppers, a pencil and an ivory writing tablet, scissors, a mirror, a comb, a brush, toothpicks, a tongue scraper, a bodkin combined with a spoon for ear wax, and a file combined with a pair of tweezers.

Source: buttons-beads-lace

shapingcontours:

(via Florentine Petticoat by Cuddlyparrot on deviantART) “I made this Italian style Renaissance gown for a recent event.  The outfit consists of a blackwork camicia (shirt), a pair-of-stays, corded petticoat, silk underskirt, silk trained skirt, silk bodice, smocked and slashed silk sleeves, a zibillino (fur), silver girdle (jewelry around the waistline), a silver perfume bottle, pearl necklace, handmade coral &amp; bone rosary, and red silk bows holding the braids in my hair in place. I’m also in process of lining a straw hat in red silk to go with the outfit.
The bodice is entirely hand-sewn. The primary seams on the skirts are sewn by machine and everything is hand finished on the exterior and hemlines.
My favorite part is the slashed silk detail at the hemline and bodice neckline.
Photographed by my husband.”

shapingcontours:

(via Florentine Petticoat by Cuddlyparrot on deviantART)
“I made this Italian style Renaissance gown for a recent event.
The outfit consists of a blackwork camicia (shirt), a pair-of-stays, corded petticoat, silk underskirt, silk trained skirt, silk bodice, smocked and slashed silk sleeves, a zibillino (fur), silver girdle (jewelry around the waistline), a silver perfume bottle, pearl necklace, handmade coral & bone rosary, and red silk bows holding the braids in my hair in place. I’m also in process of lining a straw hat in red silk to go with the outfit.

The bodice is entirely hand-sewn. The primary seams on the skirts are sewn by machine and everything is hand finished on the exterior and hemlines.

My favorite part is the slashed silk detail at the hemline and bodice neckline.

Photographed by my husband.”

Source: cuddlyparrot.deviantart.com

thedenimfoundry:

Boro. From the Beg, Borrow, Transform Exhibition Somerset House

thedenimfoundry:

Boro. From the Beg, Borrow, Transform Exhibition Somerset House

thedenimfoundry:

The Origins of Boro.
A visit to Somerset House London for the Beg Boro Transform exhibition.
During the Edo period (1603-1868) Japanese commoners were only permitted to wear clothes that were dyed blue, brown, grey or black.  Cotton had been cultivated in southern Japan from the sixteenth century but it was considered a luxury fabric and could only be afforded by the better off urban populace.  It was warmer and lighter than the cloth woven from homespun nettle, ramie or hemp.  Discarded, ‘worn out’ cotton garments from the south were valued enough to be collected by merchants whose boats plied their trade up the northern coast.  It was there they found a ready market. Fragments were purchased and pieced into layered clothes and futon covers by the rural poor for whom cotton cloth was rare and expensive.  The making of Boro cloths and clothes continued into and beyond the Meiji period (1868-1912) Text by Andy Christian.

thedenimfoundry:

The Origins of Boro.

A visit to Somerset House London for the Beg Boro Transform exhibition.

During the Edo period (1603-1868) Japanese commoners were only permitted to wear clothes that were dyed blue, brown, grey or black.  Cotton had been cultivated in southern Japan from the sixteenth century but it was considered a luxury fabric and could only be afforded by the better off urban populace.  It was warmer and lighter than the cloth woven from homespun nettle, ramie or hemp.  Discarded, ‘worn out’ cotton garments from the south were valued enough to be collected by merchants whose boats plied their trade up the northern coast.  It was there they found a ready market. Fragments were purchased and pieced into layered clothes and futon covers by the rural poor for whom cotton cloth was rare and expensive.  The making of Boro cloths and clothes continued into and beyond the Meiji period (1868-1912) Text by Andy Christian.

jyumoku:

Just finish dyeing this piece this morning in natural indigo. Many hours of stitching and tying before getting this. The key is being patience and not to rush things. #jyumoku #aizome #shibori #indigo #patience #califusa #handmade

jyumoku:

Just finish dyeing this piece this morning in natural indigo. Many hours of stitching and tying before getting this. The key is being patience and not to rush things. #jyumoku #aizome #shibori #indigo #patience #califusa #handmade

jyumoku:

Found this amazing 6”x6” #boro mat said to be from #Nagano today, one of best I’ve ever found so far. #indigo #aizome #sashiko #patchwork #japan

jyumoku:

Found this amazing 6”x6” #boro mat said to be from #Nagano today, one of best I’ve ever found so far. #indigo #aizome #sashiko #patchwork #japan